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Archive Issue 108

Archive Issue 108


64 pages. 275x215mm. .

ISSN 1352-7991 108

£7.50

Contents: Hanham to Hotwells: Industry and the Bristol Avon Part 1 by Steve Grudgings, p3; In the Showroom : Bristol Cars The Early Years by Malcolm Bobbitt, p19; Inbye: Archive’s letter page, p30; Radstock’s ‘Marble Arch’ by Duncan Harper, p33; The Chesterfield Canal by Euan Corrie, p35; The Institute: Archive’s reviews, p41; Biscuits for the World – Huntley & Palmers of Reading by Nick Deacon, p43

Archive Issue 108 - Sample Images

cover illustration
From: Hanham to Hotwells We go back in time to the early 1960s when Mr Parsons took this photograph looking down the Feeder Canal less than 200 yards from the previous one. The narrow Netham Bridge can be seen with the lockgates closed below it, the roofline of the Lockkeepers cottage can be seen too. Parsons Collection
cover illustration
From: Biscuits for the World The two immaculate (even down to the specially burnished buffers!) Black Hawthorn loco’s, with ‘A’ naturally leading and with Driver Henry Tollervey on the footplate, head an incoming train around the sharp curve on the approach to the main factory yard from the tunnels under the GWR and SER lines through to the GWR Kings Meadow yard. Six liveried H&P mineral wagons, three of the Midland Railway, one from W. H. Bowater, coal & coke merchant of Birmingham, plus three for Stephenson Clarke, make up a fascinating assortment of stock. Also of interest is the guards’ van of GWR origin hooked on to the rear of the train. It was rare for such vehicles to be seen within the factory sidings as these were more usually attached by the appropriate railway company within their own properties. But as this looks to be a specially orchestrated photograph perhaps its inclusion was thought appropriate to complete ‘the scene’. The view is east with SER signals (including a universal single post type) appearing above the roof of the Machinery Store. To the right of the latter are a laundry, timber case and tinplating workshops and a repair shop. courtesy Reading Museum