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Private Owner Wagons : A Third Collection

cover illustration
Private Owner Wagons : A Third Collection


Keith Turton

128 pages. 275x215mm. Printed on gloss art paper, casebound with printed board covers.

ISBN13 : 9781899889167

£14.99

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contents and extra information for this book »

This third volume follows on from the first two books in the series and looks at another wide range of private owner wagons and their owners. Again, 60+ operators of wagons are identified and the text is illustrated with over 170 photographs. Separate sections also cover the advertising used by wagon builders; how much the wagons cost over the years; what colours were used to paint their liveries; what they looked like at the end of their lives; and the possibility of modelling collieries. As in the previous two volumes reference is made to where models of the wagons illustrated can be obtained and a full list of sources for the original material used to compile this book is given.

Private Owner Wagons : A Third Collection - Sample Images

cover illustration
Taken in the 1930s at the Bentley Colliery, the loaded sidings are full of Barber Walker and Brentnall & Cleland wagons, the former lettered mainly for the nearby Harworth Colliery. That the photograph was taken for publicity purposes suggests that it was deliberately posed to include a representation from the company’s principal distributor.Barber Walker & Co. Ltd
cover illustration
Almost identical to wagons supplied by Charles Roberts to Stephenson Clarke, London Brick Company & Forders Ltd and the Borough of Bedford Electricity, that illustrated bears a fanciful fleet number which may refer to its identification by the wagon builder, for there are no records of any being built against an order from this owner, and it is apparent that it is on hire. The small lettering below ‘Bedford’ is impossible to decipher but it refers to the opening and closing procedures of the hopper door, the handwheel for which is, like those of the other owners, endorsed ‘This is not a brake’ and does not give directions which way to turn it to open and close the door. The full stop after the word ‘John’ should be noted – even Charles Roberts got their punctuation wrong occasionally. The wagon had a black body with white letters. courtesy HMRS, AAR013